Beautiful Bath


This last weekend we went to Bath to watch the fireworks.  They were brilliant even though the whole thing was rather “Damp”!  Actually somebody was having fun, the rain started just as we gathered in the garden to watch the display and finished as we sogged our way back into the house to put clothes in the tumbler and take turns with the hair dryer.

It is a beautiful city and wearing its autumn colours  it was just too good to pass without sharing some pictures.

The Weir on the River Avon.

The Weir on the River Avon.

A beautiful walk into town beside the river.

A beautiful walk into town beside the river.

Stained glass window inside Bath Abbey

Stained glass window inside Bath Abbey

The Amazing ceiling above the main aisle in Bath Abbey

The Amazing ceiling above the main aisle in Bath Abbey

Incredible architecture and it looks so delicate.

Incredible architecture and it looks so delicate.

Peregrine Falcons nest in this spire

Peregrine Falcons nest in this spire

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Just one of many pretty bridges in the town

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5 Comments

Filed under thought for the day (or the week or maybe even the year)

5 responses to “Beautiful Bath

  1. richard lambert

    The pictures explain why it is “Beautiful Bath”.

    Like

  2. richard lambert

    The pictures explain why it is Beautiful Bath.

    Like

  3. Gorgeous photos! Could you please explain about ‘The Weir’ photo? I was curious about the loopy wave pattern. Is that some sort of dam or reservoir? It’s something I’ve never seen before.

    The architecture & stained glass of the Abbey is spectacular! Thanks for sharing your Bath with us! 😉

    Like

    • A weir is a small dam which puts steps in a river to slow the water flow and level This is what Wiki says : A weir /ˈwɪər/ is a barrier across a river designed to alter its flow characteristics. In most cases, weirs take the form of obstructions smaller than most conventional dams, which cause water to pool behind them, while allowing water to flow steadily over their tops. Weirs are commonly used to alter the flow of rivers to prevent flooding, measure discharge, and help render rivers navigable.

      Like

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